FL Studio export low quality

ArvinArmani

DO NOT call me T-dog
Battle Points: 80
Sup y'all, i was listening to my beats exported from FLS and after my beat, i opened a schoolboy Q song, with the same player and same volume but it sounded Really louder, like 2-3 times louder. Is that a fls issue ?
 

Drago Zetić

Making samples and FL Studio sing.
Battle Points: 62
It's most likely due to dynamic range compression and the use of limiters that make music appear louder by reducing the the difference between the loudest and quietest points above a certain threshold. The music you listen to has been mastered and thus made loud, while yours most likely haven't.


Don't sweat it, though, just put a limiter on the master channel, but don't overdo it. In the end, mastering probably shouldn't be your concern, especially if you're selling beats for people to make songs to, as they'll hire a sound engineer for that.
 

Bino5150

~Mo Thugs~
You're comparing a raw beat you made to a fully mixed and mastered commercial song. That's where the difference is. Nothing wrong with FL Studio (unless you have your export settings messed up).
 

ArvinArmani

DO NOT call me T-dog
Battle Points: 80
thats the difference between a well mixed and mastered track and one that isnt.
Thanks to yall, but i found a new problem.
When i export mp3, besides the lower volume than in software and wav files, the sounds have lower quality than wav files, like the snare sounds different while listenin to mp3, when i was listenin to it in fl plylist it sounded brighter. But wav files are perfect. Even though all export settings tell me theyre exporting max quality. I know this is stupid but should i export wav then convert to mp3 ?

@2GooD Productions btw sorry for the delay, i sent u the beat we were gonna collab on, first time i sent it to 2goodproruction instead of u ...
 
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2GooD Productions

Its a fucking conspiracy!
*** ill o.g. ***
Battle Points: 183
an mp3 has a tenth of the data on average that is in a wav file, ie compressed audio. Certain frequencies are removed to make for a smaller file while trying to minimise loss. Loss is inevitable with mp3, FLAC is a "lossless" format. I would recommend exporting to at least a 256kbps even better would be 320kbps when exporting to mp3. Wav is a lossless format which also has different bitrates going up to 192khz, maybe even beyond that. The balance is between quality/file size, personally I always export to wav and have a wav master from which all other formats are derived. That way, when recording vocals, I can give them a track right next to the master wav track and get a good mix, (the best will be to give the vocals their own track on the original mix session in pro tools/cubase/logic etc) but that is not always possible. Never mix in the mp3 domain, always wav, as a high a bitrate as your storage, cpu and interface will allow. If you ever collaborate with others it is always best to send wav files, otherwise you are compromising the quality before you even begin.
 
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2GooD Productions

Its a fucking conspiracy!
*** ill o.g. ***
Battle Points: 183
I would like to add, I always export a wav and then use a different program, Soundforge with mastering plugins to get the final loud master.
So, I personally mix in cubase, export a mixed but not limited wav, then in soundforge I will use mastering eq, stereo field, compression, and limiting all within soundforge to create a "mastered" mp3, because I have found that the conversion process from wav to mp3, when you have really pushed the level to -0.2db will clip in the mp3 format.
One getaround I used was to only push the level to -0.5db in the wav file.
Or master the wav in software that can use plugins and export high quality mp3's, ie soundforge. Soundforge can also tell you what the average rms and peak level is of your final master and can detect clipping. Its a really good tool for the job.
 

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